Job 31

Shocking-Purity_hero

Job 31:1-4
31 “I made a covenant with my eyes
not to look lustfully at a young woman.
2 For what is our lot from God above,
our heritage from the Almighty on high?
3 Is it not ruin for the wicked,
disaster for those who do wrong?
4 Does he not see my ways
and count my every step?

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Job intensified his claims that he was innocent and demanded justice.

This chapter follows a protocol for court procedures in the nations of the area where Job lived. This would be swearing of allegiance to the King or deity followed by statements of “if” and “let”. These statements established the terms of the oath. The “if” describing what the accused is being accused of doing and the “let” being the terms of punishment or curses from the deity. Job’s defence of himself stated that if these accusations were true then let the full weight of the curse come upon me.

This represented Job’s final attempt to defend himself before both God and man.

He brings all of the following accusations to the table… purity (verse 1), general sin (verses 2-3), truth (verse 5), coveting (verse 7), marital faithfulness (verse 9), equity (verse 13), compassion (verses 16-21); materialism (verses 24-25), false religion (verses 26-27), love for enemies and strangers (verses 29-32), secret sin (verses 33-34), integrity within business (verses 38-40). Job recognised that he was a sinner but he asserted that he had no pattern of sin. 

He asked God to answer him (verse 35), and to explain why he suffered. Finally, he appeals to God to be the judge: if what he has claimed for himself is not true, let God himself pronounce the consequences (verses 35-40).

This was largely a reply to the accusations from Eliphaz that are outlined in chapter 22.

He spoke here of purity toward women (Prov. 6:25; Matt. 5:28).

Much temptation begins with gazing intensely at something you desire (Psalm 119:37; 1 John 2:16). Job’s covenant” commitment to refrain from lustful desire reveals his refusal to consider adultery or the acquisition of other women as part of a harem (31:9-12). He was aware that adultery can be committed with the heart as well as with the body (Matt. 5:27-28).

Job had made a covenant with himself never to look upon a woman with lust in his eyes. It appears from all accounts, that Job was a faithful husband to his wife. He was not an adulterer. This was something he had promised himself. 

I know this to be true when I trace my own adultery back. I began on that track when I stopped being disciplined with lust in the autumn on 2009. It was January 2011 when finally I ended up physically committing adultery. In the autumn of 2009 whilst I had allowed my mind to go there I didn’t think it would ever become a reality nor at that point did I want it to be a reality. I didn’t want it to be a reality in 2011 either, only I found myself in that situation, opportunity knocked and I had already played it out in my head.

A different decision that day may have led to a very different story, that’s true but the door really opened in 2009.

Job in his wisdom protected himself from that possibility. He made a covenant with his eyes.

Job knew that God was his judge. So he was careful about his actions. He made intentional decisions about his life and his ways. He knew that a man might hide his evil deeds from other people. But nobody can hide from God (Psalm 139:1-10). He was saying that there would have been no inheritance from God if he had been such a man.

God saw every detail of my secret life, my wife, my friends and others near me may have seen some cracks and may have known that something was not right but not enough to bring it into question. God dealt with it in his time and in a way that some might call punishment. I don’t see it as punishment but discipline. It was an act of grace and of love. He knew my heart, he knew I would repent but wanted me to feel the consequences and knew exactly what I needed. It was painful but to look back on it I feel it was also beautiful.

He equipped my family to handle it in a way that has matured them and helped them to grow spiritually, he equipped my closest friends to handle it in a way that has brought about growth and flourishing wisdom.

In some of the more difficult moments I wouldn’t have said that as I could not see it. My dominant feeling at the time was probably self pity. In fact I know it was self pity because I have my journals from the summer of 2015 when it all unravelled.
The point is that God is gracious and compassionate, slow to anger and abounding in love. Job knew this but was perplexed by his situation. These verses in chapter 31 lay out his defence.
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Job 31:5-6

5 “If I have walked with falsehood
or my foot has hurried after deceit—
6 let God weigh me in honest scales
and he will know that I am blameless—
7 if my steps have turned from the path,
if my heart has been led by my eyes,
or if my hands have been defiled,
8 then may others eat what I have sown,
and may my crops be uprooted.

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Job was careful about his ways
·     his actions,
·     his thoughts,
·     and his behaviour.
He was sure of his honesty and integrity. He wanted an honest judgment and he knew very well the reap what you sow principles of the world that he lived in.
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Job 31:9-12

9 “If my heart has been enticed by a woman,
or if I have lurked at my neighbour’s door,
10 then may my wife grind another man’s grain,
and may other men sleep with her.
11 For that would have been wicked,
a sin to be judged.
12 It is a fire that burns to Destruction;
it would have uprooted my harvest.
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It appears that he was accused of adultery but Job protested his innocence and knew that even lust would have taken him down. This kind of sin burned within a person until it totally destroyed them. Intimacy belongs between a man and his wife and as someone who has violated that covenant on every level I know the fallout only too well. I know what it leads to and that recovery from such a destructive pattern is rare.

It is addressed in Deuteronomy 5:18. Jesus had something to say about it as recorded in Matthew 5:27-28.

Job knew that if he had been guilty of this he may as well have given his wife over to another man. His life would have been in tatters and everything he built his life on would be uprooted and destroyed.
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Job 31:13-15

13 “If I have denied justice to any of my servants,
whether male or female,
when they had a grievance against me,
14 what will I do when God confronts me?
What will I answer when called to account?
15 Did not he who made me in the womb make them?
Did not the same one form us both within our mothers?

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In verse 15 we read that Job was aware that he answered to maker of us all and therefore treated his servants with respect. He treated his staff well.

He knew his God as the avenger and champion of all the oppressed. If he had been harsh and cruel to his dependents, he would have provoked God’s anger. Every servant was still a man, a brother; equal with his master.

Job had compassion on the poor and on his servants as well. He had never mistreated any of them. Job was saying if he had mistreated his servants, he could expect no better from God, whose servant he was (Job 2:3).

In the culture of the day and up until recent history a wealthy man would not respect his servants. He would be harsh with them. Much later, Jesus talked about this principle. It is recorded in Matthew 24:48-51.

It is important for me to remember that hierarchy is pretty meaningless. We are all brothers and sisters in this journey through life. It is too easy to think in terms of pecking orders and where I fit whether at work, within the community of church, socially, in my neighbourhood and every setting that I walk into or pass through. 

The saying “some days I am the dog and others I am the tree” rings true as an experience of life but really it is my processing that is flawed. I am made in the image of God as relational being. I exist to tell God’s  story and to propagate love in any and every situation I encounter.

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Job 31:16-23

16 “If I have denied the desires of the poor
or let the eyes of the widow grow weary,
17 if I have kept my bread to myself,
not sharing it with the fatherless—
18 but from my youth I reared them as a father would,
and from my birth I guided the widow—
19 if I have seen anyone perishing for lack of clothing,
or the needy without garments,
20 and their hearts did not bless me
for warming them with the fleece from my sheep,
21 if I have raised my hand against the fatherless,
knowing that I had influence in court,
22 then let my arm fall from the shoulder,
let it be broken off at the joint.
23 For I dreaded destruction from God,
and for fear of his splendour I could not do such things.
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Job had lived his life fearing God and taking on God’s heart for the poor and needy. He not only gave charitable offerings to the poor he connected with them he relationally reflected the heart of God.
·     Job was kind to the widows in verse 16.
·     The child in verse 17 needed a father figure. Job treated him as though he was family.
·     In verse 19 we read that he gave clothing to those that needed it.
·     He used his position of influence to defend the poor in legal situations. A voice to those without a voice.

Job knew that God had blessed his life and therefore he shared what God had given him both in terms of his wealth but also of his heart.

How would rather his bones be broken or limbs torn apart than to face God would this not have been the case as his accusers had suggested.

This raises questions about how I view those in need. I have momentary windows where I connect but more often my heart is one of selfishness and self protection. The light goes on occasionally when my heart is moved but there are many times my response is one of indifference. I want that to change.
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Job 31:24-25

24 “If I have put my trust in gold
or said to pure gold, ‘You are my security,’
25 if I have rejoiced over my great wealth,
the fortune my hands had gained,
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Job was not overly enamoured by money. His focus was God and not money. It seemed he had plenty of wealth but he knew that everything came from God.
He asserted that his security was in God and not gold. The bible speaks a lot about money and the right perspective on money. Of Jesus’ recorded words there is more said about money than love!! Clearly it is something close to our hearts and the purse strings appear to be connected to the heart strings in some way.

A healthy perspective would be “Spend some, save some, share some” …at least that’s been my recent thinking. Maybe invest some might also be an appropriate addition. However, these are issues of stewardship but what Job is speaking of here is more about where our heart is. To be focused on gold is idolatrous and a violation of our relationship with our maker. The void in our heart is shaped only for the presence of God, to try and place anything else there will not meet that need.
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Job 31:26-28

26 if I have regarded the sun in its radiance
or the moon moving in splendour,
27 so that my heart was secretly enticed
and my hand offered them a kiss of homage,
28 then these also would be sins to be judged,
for I would have been unfaithful to God on high.

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The sun and the moon were worshipped as God’s by many. A kiss was a symbol of worship in honour of men  (Genesis 41:40; Psalm 2:12), or idols (1 Kings 19:18; Hosea 13:2). If such idols were out of reach a kiss on the hand was a symbolic way of throwing kisses to them.

Job did not worship the sun or the moon, or even his own person. He knew his God was the great redeemer. He had a great awareness of idolatry and was not guilty in this way.

Our biggest challenge in idolatry is the worship of self, not in a pious or religious way but just the way that every decision we make is to please self. We dress it up in other ways at times but often there is a pay off to our own well being, our ego or some way of propping up of self that makes us feel significant. I know some people who are successful in the battle against that on some level but most of us are not. I think at best we have small God centred victories.

I don’t think it’s something to over think or analyse but something to go to God with knowing that he is the only one who can sort this out. He is our redeemer.
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Job 31:29-30

29 “If I have rejoiced at my enemy’s misfortune
or gloated over the trouble that came to him—
30 I have not allowed my mouth to sin
by invoking a curse against their life—

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Jobs claim was that he never wished ill of his enemies or rejoiced in another persons suffering. He kept a careful guard about what came out of his mouth. He knew that this was not the heart of God.

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Job 31:31-32

31 if those of my household have never said,
‘Who has not been filled with Job’s meat?’—
32 but no stranger had to spend the night in the street,
for my door was always open to the traveller—
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Job’s defence continues with an assertion of his attitude towards travellers and strangers. He was a hospitable man and would ensure that those passing through were looked after.

This makes me think about how welcoming and kind I should be to those around me. In this fast paced modern world that we live in and the multiple distractions that take us away from relationships we can easily be focused on our own pleasure and forget about the value of connection. 

In the church we kind of have a programmed connection and forced connection in the form of various different group meetings. Family group, church meetings, discipling times but all of these can lack the authenticity of just being a relational being. This is not a criticism of the practice but rather a question about how far gone we are that we have to create a programme to be relational.

Yesterday we were in a small Essex village and we stopped and had three conversations with strangers. It was just small talk. Two we asked for directions and one we were in the village shop but all three offered more than we asked for in terms of conversational content. That is rare in London. We are however …wired for relationship.

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Job 31:33-34

33 if I have concealed my sin as people do,
by hiding my guilt in my heart
34 because I so feared the crowd
and so dreaded the contempt of the clans
that I kept silent and would not go outside
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The NIV translates verse 33 with the words “as people do”. The Hebrew text could equally be translated “If I covered my transgressions as Adam”, this may indicate familiarity with the narrative of Genesis but more likely is a generic term for the common man. However, Adam did indeed hide from God when he violated the relationship (Genesis 3:8).

Job claimed that he did not hide. He lived accessible to all and transparent. 

He allowed accusations to be levied against him and answered them.

In Proverbs 28:13 we are informed “Whoever conceals their sins does not prosper”. Job knew very well this spiritual truth since God sees everything and knows the motives of our hearts. He was not someone who would cover up his flaws or blame others for things that went wrong. Even throughout the trauma of his current predicament he was not one to blame but rather struggled with understanding why things had turned out the way they had.

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Job 31:35-40

35 (“Oh, that I had someone to hear me!
I sign now my defence—let the Almighty answer me;
let my accuser put his indictment in writing.
36 Surely I would wear it on my shoulder,
I would put it on like a crown.
37 I would give him an account of my every step;
I would present it to him as to a ruler.)—
38 “if my land cries out against me
and all its furrows are wet with tears,
39 if I have devoured its yield without payment
or broken the spirit of its tenants,
40 then let briers come up instead of wheat
and stinkweed instead of barley.”
The words of Job are ended.

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Job protested his innocence and invited further accusation from God, he felt that in the presence of God he would be vindicated and justice done. He felt that God was the source of his trouble but could not understand why that would have been the case.

Whatever God said, the Job would accept. That was his position.

He ended his speech with words about the earth being his testimony.

He had often spoken about the soil at the end of previous speeches (Job 7:21; Job 10:21-22; Job 17:16; Job 21:33). We are created from the earth (Genesis 2:7). We return to the earth when we die (Genesis 3:19).

Job had respected the land, the people that had been placed in his path and most of all he had respected his maker. The earth could testify to this but if the land spoke out against him and reclaimed him then his body would be returned to the ground. Nobody would cultivate the soil that he had once taken such good care of. Weeds would grow instead of healthy fruitful crops.

Job finished his speech with these sad words.

Job 29

Spirit


Job 29:1-6
Job’s Final Defense

29 Job continued his discourse:
2 “How I long for the months gone by,
for the days when God watched over me,
3 when his lamp shone on my head
and by his light I walked through darkness!
4 Oh, for the days when I was in my prime,
when God’s intimate friendship blessed my house,
5 when the Almighty was still with me
and my children were around me,
6 when my path was drenched with cream
and the rock poured out for me streams of olive oil.
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Job’s concluding monologues present a summary of his righteousness and an appeal for justice.

Job was coming to a spiritual realization as the verses at the end of chapter 28 seem to indicate but here we see him lamenting for how life used to be and harking back to his wonder years and that God blessed him and took care of him.

He harked back to his successful life
·     God was protecting him and providing for him (Job 1:10).
·     Job became rich (Job 1:3, 1:21).
·     He had a large family (Job 1:2).
·     It appears that he had a productive, fruitful and successful farm with an abundance of cream and olive oil.
He longed for the days when he knew that God was present and on his side. What he perhaps wasn’t so clear about was that God was still with him and on his side in this difficult time even when his friends were attacking him, even when he was struggling with his health and feeling despair. God was just as near him in this time as in the successful times.

These are poignant words as I feel quite low at the moment (May 2017) about work and how I really find it hard to want to be there as it’s become quite a negative atmosphere and all I hear all the time is that our performance is not good enough, we need more, there needs to be more intensity about what we do.

I can find myself longing for the days when I was successful but for whatever reason God is here and present and sees fit that I should go through this difficult time. On a scale of hardship it doesn’t compare with anything that Job was enduring but that’s not the point.

This is about God being present in the good, the bad and the ugly of life. God allowing something in life to shape us.
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Job 29:7-11

7 “When I went to the gate of the city
and took my seat in the public square,
8 the young men saw me and stepped aside
and the old men rose to their feet;
9 the chief men refrained from speaking
and covered their mouths with their hands;
10 the voices of the nobles were hushed,
and their tongues stuck to the roof of their mouths.
11 Whoever heard me spoke well of me,
and those who saw me commended me,
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These verses within Job’s lament give us some further insight into his life before his troubles came.

He was clearly an influential man. He was respected as a leader in his community, perhaps even a judge.

In patriarchal times, walls would surround a city. There would be a square by the city’s main gate. People would gather there for meetings. The leaders of the community would make decisions there and the judges would hold court.

Job attended the meetings of the rulers. He was considered a wise man with some authority.

There was a healthy fear and respect of his wisdom from old and young alike. He had a reputation as a fair man and was a known figure.

Whilst Job’s fall from the pedestal he was on was undeserved, he had done nothing wrong. It had a purpose that he nor others knew anything about. It was the result of something happening in the heavenly realms.

I know the same situation for different reasons. I did not just fall from a pedestal, the pedestal was completely smashed. It was also a result of something going on in the spiritual realms but it was caused by my dishonesty, lack of authenticity, the resultant thievery, sexual immorality and everything else that was hidden in my life. God will not be mocked. Everything that was propping me up had to come down with a crash.

I spoke at conferences throughout the UK and overseas, I received a lot of affirmation for my insightful style of preaching, teaching and speaking. I was part of an influential leadership team and was well known for various aspects of spiritual life in our international community of churches. It had to go. My ego was bound up in it. 

Do I lament that influence? Occasionally I will remember something and feel a mixed feeling about it. I will feel sad about what was going on underneath and that at that time I couldn’t handle “success” with authenticity. I genuinely no longer desire that mantel of “being somebody”. I enjoy living quietly getting on with life and find joy in my family, my close friendships, simple things of life and my creative pursuits. I wouldn’t trade my walk with God that I have now for anything …any level of fame or fortune. To feel peace every day, to have a clear conscience every day and to feel connected every day is a great blessing.

Not every day is a good day. I have my lustful moments when I notice a woman and I have temptations towards dishonesty which usually comes in the form of wanting to cover up mistakes I have made at work, I have the desire to run from difficult situations quite often or escape into something more palatable than face the difficult situation but I make the right decision more often than the wrong decision and I have learned to U turn when I head in the wrong direction.

In my former life when I had the opportunity to U turn I just ran faster. On some level I identify with some of Job’s lament and there is something that causes me to grieve about my former life but it’s mostly … I wish I could have handled it differently.

Today I am blessed. Life is different. It has taken a few different turns in my 54 years. Life is far from the utopian freedom that I sometimes long for but it is good. God is good.

Job knew that God is good. He struggled to reconcile this with what happened to him and searched his soul to understand it. This lament is part of that process.

We don’t always get we want but always we get what we need for our spiritual health and the best opportunity that we can have to know God and connect with him. He knows us intimately. He knew that Job would benefit from this and he knew what I needed to go through for my heart to be in a place where it could respond to God at a deeper level and ignite my desire with a more enduring flame.
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Job 29:12-17

12 because I rescued the poor who cried for help,
and the fatherless who had none to assist them.
13 The one who was dying blessed me;
I made the widow’s heart sing.
14 I put on righteousness as my clothing;
justice was my robe and my turban.
15 I was eyes to the blind
and feet to the lame.
16 I was a father to the needy;
I took up the case of the stranger.
17 I broke the fangs of the wicked
and snatched the victims from their teeth.
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In these verses we read about the Poor, fatherless, ready to perish, widow’s etc.,

All over the ancient Near Eastern world, a man’s virtue was measured by his treatment of the weakest and most vulnerable members of society. If he protected and provided for this group, he was respected. Job had been accused if not doing such things and this being the cause of his suffering and yet Job had indeed taken this responsibility seriously.

Taking care of the vulnerable and the poor is to carry the very heart of God. Contrary to the accusations of the 3 friends, Job went beyond the standards of the day to care for the widow, the orphan, the poor, the disabled, and the abused. Job saw to it that they had their needs taken care of. If he even heard of someone in trouble, he searched them out, and helped them.
Job was saying that he was just as tough on the wicked, as he was kind to the innocent. He was a champion and upholder of justice.

He carried the very heart of God in his being as best as he could with his human limitations. It is interesting that the words in verse 13 about putting on righteousness as clothing echoes down the millennia to Galatians 3:27 and being clothed in Christ or Ephesians 6:10-18 putting on the full armour of God. There is a recognition that his righteousness was not his own and that it came from God.

These are stirring words and his heart for the poor challenges me. I feel a love and compassion in some moments and certainly when I was working with the guys in the addiction recovery programme that I ran. I would feel it or if I bother to stop and talk with a homeless person I might find a connection or if I see suffering.

I pray for a softer heart towards the vulnerable and the poor, to carry the heart of God to the hurting and needy. I am selfish at the core of my being and I have moments when the light goes on and my heart softens but day to day I don’t really think too far beyond myself  and that’s not a great way to live.
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Job 29:18-20

18 “I thought, ‘I will die in my own house,
my days as numerous as the grains of sand.
19 My roots will reach to the water,
and the dew will lie all night on my branches.
20 My glory will not fade;
the bow will be ever new in my hand.’
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Job had experienced a lifelong intimate walk with God and his life had been one of vitality, health, energy and living with God’s blessings of fruitfulness and family. He expected to die a satisfied old man surrounded by family. This was his expectation and was the common expectation of a righteous man in his day.
He had no sense that this was coming, no hints, no clues. His world was turned upside down in a very sudden and immediate way.

Sometimes God changes our lives. Something comes out of the blue, stops us in our tracks and we are faced not with the life we were expecting but a very different life. It’s hard to compare any personal experience with Job in this sense. 

Certainly once my great unravelling began I knew that life would be different from now on and didn’t quite know exactly how different it would be. I might go to jail, I might not be able to repair my relationships with my family or my close friends, I might live in exile to the spiritual family, I might head further down a self destructive path. It was a time of fear and uncertainty but it was also a time of great blessing and relief. The pressure was off, I was no longer running away, hiding in the shadows, faking anything. I had to deal with shame first and though that was not my intentional thought, a good friend recommended a book called “the gifts of imperfection” which I read whilst living in my car and sofa surfing during August 2015.
All of this was sudden but it wasn’t unexpected given what had happened. My life would change. God had a different plan than I had previously thought for my life. In some ways I knew there was great challenge ahead and great suffering in the present for those that had been hurt, betrayed, let down by my actions but there was also a freedom emerging from a self imposed prison of a double life underpinned by dishonesty and play acting. Multi talented insightful spiritual leader with a gift for preaching on the outside and a secret life of sexual sin, flirting, deceit and financial ruin on the other. A man who lied, cheated and blagged his way through life.

However we look at life changes whether sudden or surprising, brought on by our own actions or events outside of our control. We can be sure that God is present, that he is involved and he wants to do something with our cooperation that will be fundamentally for our good. Countless Biblical stories are evidence of this and Job is one of those stories.

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Job 29:21-25

21 “People listened to me expectantly,
waiting in silence for my counsel.
22 After I had spoken, they spoke no more;
my words fell gently on their ears.
23 They waited for me as for showers
and drank in my words as the spring rain.
24 When I smiled at them, they scarcely believed it;
the light of my face was precious to them.
25 I chose the way for them and sat as their chief;
I dwelt as a king among his troops;
I was like one who comforts mourners.
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Job reminded his friends that there had been a day when no one had rejected his insights. He was known as a man of depth and profound understanding. His walk with God was well known and he was respected as a spiritual and wise man. His leadership galvanized people and inspired loyalty.

Once Job spoke the debate was over. His words made sense. He was very influential..

Now he was in a situation where his friends would not agree with anything that came from his mouth. Bildad said that he would prefer to listen to the wind (Job 8:2).
Job had not changed. Only his circumstances had changed.

Job 26

storm clouds


Job 26:1-4

26 Then Job replied:
2 “How you have helped the powerless!
How you have saved the arm that is feeble!
3 What advice you have offered to one without wisdom!
And what great insight you have displayed!
4 Who has helped you utter these words?
And whose spirit spoke from your mouth?
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In verses 1-4 Job responded to Bildad’s lack of concern for him, showing that all his friends’ theological and rational words missed the point of Job’s need altogether and have been completely unhelpful.

Job himself has virtually said much the same as Bildad (Job 9:2; Job 14:4), so he makes no further comment on his remarks here, but merely asks how he has helped him with such words, or others like him in a weak and helpless condition.

In six sarcastic questions Job tells Bildad that God would be in a great deal of trouble if Bildad had not been there to help God! Then Job outdoes Bildad in describing the majesty, power and greatness of God.
Job had studied wisdom (chapter 28). So Job believed that words about God should not merely come from the human mind. Rather, such words should come from God’s Holy Spirit (2 Peter 1:21).

In chapter 25, Bildad’s speech seemed to describe vast spaces. He spoke about heaven. He spoke about the moon and stars. He spoke about the soil. And he referred to graves. Job’s reply seems to describe even more vast spaces. Job spoke about hell as well as heaven. He spoke about the sky and the clouds. He spoke about mysteries of the day, for example the horizon and the rain.

Job also spoke about some events which we will look at in verses 12-13. We do not know much about these events. We may not even be sure whether these are past or future events. But the Bible seems to mention the same events elsewhere. Some people think that Job was referring to stories from other ancient societies. Possibly, stories from Mesopotamia.
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Job 26:5-14

5 “The dead are in deep anguish,
those beneath the waters and all that live in them.
6 The realm of the dead is naked before God;
Destruction lies uncovered.
7 He spreads out the northern skies over empty space;
he suspends the earth over nothing.
8 He wraps up the waters in his clouds,
yet the clouds do not burst under their weight.
9 He covers the face of the full moon,
spreading his clouds over it.
10 He marks out the horizon on the face of the waters
for a boundary between light and darkness.
11 The pillars of the heavens quake,
aghast at his rebuke.
12 By his power he churned up the sea;
by his wisdom he cut Rahab to pieces.
13 By his breath the skies became fair;
his hand pierced the gliding serpent.
14 And these are but the outer fringe of his works;
how faint the whisper we hear of him!
Who then can understand the thunder of his power?”
———————————————-

Job used three words to describe the place of the dead: “the waters, hell,” and “destruction”: This is his way of saying that if God sees what is going on in the world of the dead, He certainly knows all the world of the living. God has authority over the realms of both the dead and the living.

In verses 5-14 as before in chapters 9 and 12, Job showed that he was not inferior to this friends in describing God’s greatness. He understood that as well as they did. He described it as manifested in the realm of the dead called Sheol and Abaddon, or place of destruction (verses 5 and 6), the earth and sky (verse 7), the waters above (verses 8-10) and below (verse 12, and the stars (verse 13).

The Hebrew word is the Rephaim, who were among the aboriginal inhabitants of the south of Palestine and the neighbourhood of the Dead Sea.
It is used to express the dead and the inhabitants of the underworld generally. The translation is awkward but it seems to imply that they are pierced through with terror, or they tremble.

All the secrets of this mysterious, invisible, and undiscoverable world are naked and open before God. The grave lies naked and destruction is uncovered.

Job described hell. Elsewhere, Job was not sure whether hell exists (Job 3:13-14; Job 21:22-26). But in these verses, Job was not explaining his own ideas. Instead, he was speaking by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Bildad had thought of God as dwelling in heaven alone. He did not realize that God was omnipresent. God is not only in heaven but on the earth as well. This could be speaking of hell that is under the water.

Even hell is within the view of God. It is also under the control of God. God is not controlled by anyone or anything. Even Satan has to answer to him and cannot leave his presence.

In verses 7-10 and 13: With great accuracy, Job described the world as it is – created out of “nothing” by the Maker of heaven and earth (Genesis 1:1). This is especially remarkable since the Book of Job predates the Book of Genesis. He speaks of the Holy Spirit’s role in Creation. (Genesis 1:2, 26). 

This is breath taking and inspiring. We all need moments to stop and take it in. Our modern world is too fast paced for us to sometimes stop and be inspired. We live behind too much concrete and in too much artificial light. We are too full of our human ingenuity (which God gave us) and can lose sight of God’s awesomeness.
Many ancient people thought that the earth was on poles. Even Job mentions these poles elsewhere. But Job’s words here are correct. Scientists have proved that an empty space surrounds the world. God balances the world on nothing.

It was by God’s hand that the stars were scattered into space. Of course, all planets, the moon and sun, were created by God, and placed in the empty space of the sky; and told to stay in their places. The earth is not hanging or sitting on anything. It is in the open sky, where God put it and told it to stay.

God’s design of this world is amazing. We need the rain. Nothing holds the rain in the sky. It doesn’t make sense that something as heavy as water can be held in the sky and poured out at an appropriate time. Of course we have scientific explanations for it but the design and system behind the science didn’t come from a human mind. 

As a mere observer in the days of Job when science was not so advanced it would have filled with wonder and if you stop and engage with nature and even think about it in some detail with it’s complex eco systems … it’s just mind blowing.

Verse 9 reminds us that We are dealing with the King of Kings, the only true king. We may not see him but it doesn’t stop him from being king!!!

The theme of God’s power over the sea (“water with bounds”) is common to the poetic genres in the Bible (Psalm 104:7-9; Proverbs 8:27-29; Jeremiah 5:22). For God to have power over the chaos of the sea symbolized that He has power over everything that seems chaotic and evil to humanity. Imagine the disciples reaction when Jesus calmed the storm or walked on water. They would have been familiar with these verses. I shiver runs down my spine as I imagine the situation. I imagine whispers of  “Who is this rabbi that is with us?”

This describes the earth as a circular sphere, a scientifically accurate statement before it’s time in human history.

In verse 11 we are reminded that no one can usurp God’s power. Satan’s best attempt will leave him destroyed at the end of all things. God created the world by his word (Genesis 1:3-26). Psalm 2:4-6 has feelings and emotions. When driven by human emotion we can be very powerful and influence a lot. Passion is a great galvanizer. How much more the passion of an unlimited God? Nobody can successfully oppose God.

Verses 11-13 seem to describe a particular event.
·     The enemy in verse 12 is called RAHAB in Hebrew. This word is also in Isaiah 51:9. Isaiah seems to be describing a terrible sea animal. This however is a symbolic description of the army from Egypt. Or, as a description of the sea. God’s people were tapped by the sea but God parted the sea to allow the Israelites to escape (Isaiah 51:10). The Egypt army drowned (Exodus chapter 14).

·     The enemy in verse 13 is NACHASH in Hebrew. This word usually means a snake or serpent. In the garden called Eden, the devil appeared as a NACHASH. This word is also in Isaiah 27:1. Isaiah described the same event as Job 26:13. But in Isaiah, the NACHASH has another name too. This name is leviathan. The word leviathan is in Job 3:8 and Job chapter 41. We have translated leviathan as ‘crocodile’, which seems to be the animal that God described in Job chapter 41. But in both Isaiah and Job, leviathan could potentially by symbolic of Satan.
So, in the end, God will punish the devil (Revelation 20:10). This is the event that Isaiah described in Isaiah 27:1. But the words in Isaiah 27:1 are similar to Isaiah 51:9. So we think that Job was describing the devil’s final punishment in verses 11-13.

In the closing verses of this chapter Job offers a perspective that all he had cited about God’s unrivalled power over the grave, over nature, over the earth and skies, was a faint outline of His infinite, incomprehensible sovereignty.

Poetic language reminding his counselors that all that could be said and understood by man was only a glimpse of the nature and power of God almighty!

We know that thunder is connected with the voice of God frequently. When Moses had the Israelites at the foot of the mountain to hear the Commandments, the voice of God was spoken of as a thunder. It gripped the Israelites with fear.

Job 20

joy

Job 20:1-11
Zophar

20 Then Zophar the Naamathite replied:
2 “My troubled thoughts prompt me to answer
because I am greatly disturbed.
3 I hear a rebuke that dishonours me,
and my understanding inspires me to reply.
4 “Surely you know how it has been from of old,
ever since mankind was placed on the earth,
5 that the mirth of the wicked is brief,
the joy of the godless lasts but a moment.
6 Though the pride of the godless person reaches to the heavens
and his head touches the clouds,
7 he will perish forever, like his own dung;
those who have seen him will say, ‘Where is he?’
8 Like a dream he flies away, no more to be found,
banished like a vision of the night.
9 The eye that saw him will not see him again;
his place will look on him no more.
10 His children must make amends to the poor;
his own hands must give back his wealth.
11 The youthful vigour that fills his bones
will lie with him in the dust.
——————————–
Zophar’s second speech focuses on two key ideas: the prosperity of the wicked is short, and his doom is certain.

The have their “short” times of “triumphing” – there may be “passing pleasures of sin” (Hebrews 11:25), but judgement is coming. Job’s spiritual experience did not line up with Zophar’s rigid expectations, so Job was branded amongst the “wicked”.

It appeared to Zophar that Job seemed to think that evil people had successful lives. Zophar wanted to prove that this idea was wrong.

Contrary to Zophar’s confident assertion, sometimes wicked people live long lives. For example, Noah endured the wickedness of his neighbours for 120 years while he preached and built the ark (Genesis 6:3), and God gave the Canaanites four centuries before He judged them as a nation. Later he allowed the Egyptians, the Assyrians, The Babylonians all to have long periods of prosperity with his people the Israelites in slavery to the evil empires !!

In Job’s day, people respected older people and their ideas (Job 32:6-9). So the people believed that ancient wisdom was very important (Job 8:8-9). Zophar calls on ancient wisdom as the support for his position.

In verses 5-6, the application of Zophar’s words about this wicked, hypocritical, proud person were aimed at Job. He would, like others so wicked, suffer the consequences of his sins (verses 7-29).

This wicked man may be powerful while he is alive. But when he dies, nobody will even remember this man. He asserts that Job will amount to nothing but a forgotten grave.

Job had reached a very high position of prosperity before all of the calamity came upon him. It appears, that Zophar may have been jealous of that high esteem, and had hoped that Job would fall. It did not matter how highly he was thought of, Zophar said he would fall as low as Job had, sitting in the heap of ashes. He said he would fall so low that no one could find him. Some might ask, where he had gone.
It’s a weighty accusation.

I read and wrote about these verses whilst an event that reminded me of a past glory of being highly thought of, esteemed and appreciated. It was an event that I helped pioneer and ran for 16 years. This is what I wrote about that experience. 

There is a whole generation here that know nothing of that legacy and a handful that remember but know the height from which I fell. It is strange, to be here but special. I see my fingerprints all over the event. The way it’s organised, the programme, the culture but it’s no longer mine. It gives me both a satisfaction that I built something good and enduring but also a sadness that I miss it and wished I could have carried on. 

I suppose I am attempting to step into Jobs shoes of being forgotten, of losing his influence and how that might have felt. It appears that whilst his friends and accusers are focused on that outward thing, his focus is more about what he perceives as his abandonment by God. 

My experience has been one of encouragement, Grace and even gratitude from those that knew what I had a hand in building. One person who did not know me innocently asked “is it the first time you have been to one of these events” …there was a time that everyone knew who I was.——————————————————–

Job 20:12-19

12 “Though evil is sweet in his mouth
and he hides it under his tongue,
13 though he cannot bear to let it go
and lets it linger in his mouth,
14 yet his food will turn sour in his stomach;
it will become the venom of serpents within him.
15 He will spit out the riches he swallowed;
God will make his stomach vomit them up.
16 He will suck the poison of serpents;
the fangs of an adder will kill him.
17 He will not enjoy the streams,
the rivers flowing with honey and cream.
18 What he toiled for he must give back uneaten;
he will not enjoy the profit from his trading.
19 For he has oppressed the poor and left them destitute;
he has seized houses he did not build.
——————————–

These verses represent the heart of how Zophar perceived Job’s life and circumstances. Whilst his observation are general truths about the gains of evil behaviour being short lived and not truly enjoyable. The bounty will be consumed without peace etc., …this we know was not the case in Job’s situation. Verses 12-16 imply that the evil deeds of a man are like a poison with an enticing taste and yet it will not be as tasty as the first bite. It will turn sour in his stomach and ultimately may kill him.

Zophar was listing sins that could have been committed by Job, implying that this was the root of his trouble. He said that he had oppressed the poor and taken their house away from them.
——————————–

Job 20:20-29

20 “Surely he will have no respite from his craving;
he cannot save himself by his treasure.
21 Nothing is left for him to devour;
his prosperity will not endure.
22 In the midst of his plenty, distress will overtake him;
the full force of misery will come upon him.
23 When he has filled his belly,
God will vent his burning anger against him
and rain down his blows on him.
24 Though he flees from an iron weapon,
a bronze-tipped arrow pierces him.
25 He pulls it out of his back,
the gleaming point out of his liver.
Terrors will come over him;
26     total darkness lies in wait for his treasures.
A fire unfanned will consume him
and devour what is left in his tent.
27 The heavens will expose his guilt;
the earth will rise up against him.
28 A flood will carry off his house,
rushing waters on the day of God’s wrath.
29 Such is the fate God allots the wicked,
the heritage appointed for them by God.”
—————————–

Zophar’s narrative continues
Money cannot save anyone from death. Ill gained wealth will not save the evil man from the wrath of God!

The evil man’s gains will not even bring him peace in this life. He may through his guilty conscience live in constant fear and weariness of being found out. There is also the fact that what he has can be taken from him at any moment.

Zophar implied that Job constantly hungered for more. He was never satisfied. What may have begun as a sincere but misguided line of questioning from his friends was now a full blown accusation levied against Job.

Zophar said that God would take all of it away from him, so he would have nothing left for other men to take.

God is a fair judge. He will deal with every man according to his deeds. A man might be able to escape from his enemies. But nobody can escape from God.

These verses tell of a harsh judgment of wrath from the hand of God and whilst there is truth in God’s judgment to suggest that Job would be at the mercy of such judgment was brutal.

Verse 24 is literally translated as “The glittering sword” from the Hebrew bârâq. It describes the brightness of the sword piercing the gall which was supposed to be the seat of life (see notes Job 16:13).

Verse 26 implies a fire from heaven, not lit by human hands. Probably lightning or brimstone would consume everything.

This darkness represented total separation from the Light of God. In the case of Job, his wife was left and some of his servants. Zophar said it would not go well with them because they were living in Job’s house.
Zophar thought that everybody would agree with him. But, as Job would explain in chapter 21, Zophar had overlooked the fact that many people who do wicked things are very successful during their lives on earth. They do not die when they are young. It is true that God will punish them in the end.

The implications on Job that he was experiencing punishment and there was more to come although contained some observational truth in the ways of God was theologically flawed.

Job had asked for heaven and earth to witness for him. Zophar was saying that heaven and earth would be opposed to Job. He was trying to offset everything that Job had said.

Zophar was summarizing the things he had said in the last few verses that he thought would come to Job. He thought Job to be full of unrepentant evil and therefore had no heritage.

Job 13

thRNAHSAVH
Job 13:1-12
13 “My eyes have seen all this,
my ears have heard and understood it.
2 What you know, I also know;
I am not inferior to you.
3 But I desire to speak to the Almighty
and to argue my case with God.
4 You, however, smear me with lies;
you are worthless physicians, all of you!
5 If only you would be altogether silent!
For you, that would be wisdom.
6 Hear now my argument;
listen to the pleas of my lips.
7 Will you speak wickedly on God’s behalf?
Will you speak deceitfully for him?
8 Will you show him partiality?
Will you argue the case for God?
9 Would it turn out well if he examined you?
Could you deceive him as you might deceive a mortal?
10 He would surely call you to account
if you secretly showed partiality.
11 Would not his splendour terrify you?
Would not the dread of him fall on you?
12 Your maxims are proverbs of ashes;
your defences are defences of clay.
————————————————————
Job’s patience with his three friends was wearing thin. He understood everything they were saying, he had lived and taught these things. They refused to believe that he had not sinned and brought this upon himself.

Zophar thought that he had superior wisdom (Job 11:6). And Eliphaz’s advice came from a spirit (Job 4:17). But they did not explain anything that Job did not already know.
Job used the words “I am not inferior unto you” which indicated a growing resentment towards his friends. They were attempting to teach him to repent. He already knew how to do that!

Job had experienced a litany of wounding words from his friends. He declared them a bunch of useless physicians of no value, and all the more desired an audience with God.
Job trusted God. He believed that God is fair and that he would explain Job’s situation.
He was saying that he would rather debate the matter with God than with his friends. He was not afraid of presenting his cause before him, because God would know his heart and his integrity, and would not deal with him in an unmerciful manner as his friends had done.

Job had no intention of trying to prove his innocence to anyone, but God.

In verses 4-19: Job addressed his ineffective counsellors. Silence would be wisdom for them and he would be quite capable of addressing God and presenting his case himself.
Job now turned to the friends and asked them of their own motives. He would like to know if they were examined as closely as he had been, would they be able to stand. They were mocking Job. They should consider their own faults, before they began to find fault in others.

Maybe he accused his friends of becoming his friends, because of his high standing. He had been a wealthy man, when they became his friends. Perhaps he was questioning their motives in becoming his friends. Had they been his friends because of their great admiration for his belief in God, or were they his friends because of his wealth?

Job and his friends were sitting on ashes. And Job was using a piece of pottery to scrape against his boils and give him relief (Job 2:8). Ashes are not useful for any purpose. And cheap pots are not much use either. So Job was suggesting that his friends’ speeches like the ashes and broken pottery were hopeless.

Ashes are easily blown away. They had forgotten the good that Job had done. They were just clay and ashes.

It’s easy to be consumed with what other people think of you. Especially people who you may count as friends. There is a deep desire in all of us for acceptance. I struggled for many years and continue to struggle with how I am viewed by others. Thankfully that particular rug has been pulled from under my feet and I am no longer on some kind of pedestal so I don’t have anywhere to go with that. It is a blessing. The pressure is off. The pedestal was always imaginary anyway.

—————————————————————-
Job 13:13-19
13 “Keep silent and let me speak;
then let come to me what may.
14 Why do I put myself in jeopardy
and take my life in my hands?
15 Though he slay me, yet will I hope in him;
I will surely defend my ways to his face.
16 Indeed, this will turn out for my deliverance,
for no godless person would dare come before him!
17 Listen carefully to what I say;
let my words ring in your ears.
18 Now that I have prepared my case,
I know I will be vindicated.
19 Can anyone bring charges against me?
If so, I will be silent and die.
—————————————————————
Job’s friends warned him not to argue with God. They believed that his issue was one of needing to repent of some hidden sin.

Job  however, was confident enough of his position to have no fear in taking it to God and reasoning with him. Job was saying, “I will not be a hypocrite and try to be something that I am not”. He did not wish to be silent and die. He needed to say something.

Job was not absolutely sure what the outcome would be but he needed to be heard and his wrestling with this would not allow himself to just accept it as it was.
—————————————————————
Job 13:20-28
20 “Only grant me these two things, God,
and then I will not hide from you:
21 Withdraw your hand far from me,
and stop frightening me with your terrors.
22 Then summon me and I will answer,
or let me speak, and you reply to me.
23 How many wrongs and sins have I committed?
Show me my offense and my sin.
24 Why do you hide your face
and consider me your enemy?
25 Will you torment a windblown leaf?
Will you chase after dry chaff?
26 For you write down bitter things against me
and make me reap the sins of my youth.
27 You fasten my feet in shackles;
you keep close watch on all my paths
by putting marks on the soles of my feet.
28 “So man wastes away like something rotten,
like a garment eaten by moths.
———————————————————–
Job asked God to take the pain away, so that he would be able to speak to God as his judge.

He wanted to question God about his sin and wrongdoing. He felt that he had the strength of a windblown leaf or dry chaff both easily blown away by the wind.
He talked about wasting and rotting away maybe thinking about his illness. Perhaps insects were attacking his boils. His body seemed so weak. He was sure that he would die soon. He just wanted to face God and get some answers!

Job 12

eric-lacombe-intro
Job 12:1-3
12 Then Job replied:
2 “Doubtless you are the only people who matter,
and wisdom will die with you!
3 But I have a mind as well as you;
I am not inferior to you.
Who does not know all these things?
————————————————–
Job had enough of his claims, he somewhat sarcastically stated that all “wisdom shall die” with them.

Zophar and the others didn’t have exclusivity on wisdom; Job was also a wise man who trusted fully in the ways of the Lord. He said that he would continue to look to God for forgiveness, protection, and provision.

In verses 12:1 – 14:22: Job responded in his defence with strong words, completing the first cycle of speeches.

In chapter 4, Eliphaz told a story about a spirit. And he explained that nobody is perfect.
In chapter 8, Bildad preferred traditional ideas. He explained that God only punishes evil people. In chapter 11, Zophar chose to speak about secret wisdom. He thought that Job deserved an even worse punishment for his evil deeds. All Job’s friends agreed that God would not bring such punishment and calamity a good man. So when they saw Job’s troubles, they accused him of secret sin.

Zophar said that he knew some secrets about wisdom (Job 11:6). But Job did disputed this claim. Zophar’s words were too simplistic. He reminded his friends that he understood the principles of which they had spoken (verse 3), but they were irrelevant to his situation. On top of that, he grieved at the pain of becoming a mockery to his friends. He protested his innocence (verse 4).

Job was not morally or intellectually inferior to his friends. He was effectively saying “Who do you think you are?”
————————————————–
Job 12:4-5

4 “I have become a laughingstock to my friends,
though I called on God and he answered—
a mere laughingstock, though righteous and blameless!
5 Those who are at ease have contempt for misfortune
as the fate of those whose feet are slipping.
—————————————————–
It’s always hard to know what to say when someone is grieving, it’s perhaps even harder when they themselves are going through unprecedented suffering.

Probably the most helpful thing we can do in those times is to just be there, listen and connect. Jobs’ friends persisted in their insensitivity and continued to correct him for something they had imagined!!

He had been a well known community pillar of the region and now he was a laughing stock …on top of all the tragedy. It must have been hard to comprehend and accept. He shifted from one life to another in a very short space of time.

This happened to me in the summer of 2015. It was my own doing after the stupid decisions I had made. Decisions of infidelity, borrowing money from a pot of petty cash in my workplace that evolved from “borrowing” into theft, decisions of deceit and dishonesty  began to escalate around the beginning of 2015 and by the summer of that year they came crashing down on my head. The brief period of homelessness that followed was challenging and emotionally hard but defining for me.

I remember thinking a lot about the trauma I brought on my family and walking past the house to see if I could get a glimpse of them. I longed to be back in their presence.

Job’s loss was greater, he had his friends set against him for no apparent reason except a naïve view of what God was doing and he was plagued with boils and illness. It’s hard to imagine how I would be in that situation. I knew I deserved what I was going through and somehow even managed to embrace it in some small way despite the self pity, sadness and uncertainty but Job deserved none of what was going on for him.
—————————————————–
Job 12:6-10
6 The tents of marauders are undisturbed,
and those who provoke God are secure—
those God has in his hand.
7 “But ask the animals, and they will teach you,
or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you;
8 or speak to the earth, and it will teach you,
or let the fish in the sea inform you.
9 Which of all these does not know
that the hand of the Lord has done this?
10 In his hand is the life of every creature
and the breath of all mankind.
————————————-
Job noticed that birds and animals also suffer troubles without any reason. He observed that things seemed to work and be sustained. He was convinced that the animals, the birds and fish would testify to the hand of God sustaining them if only they could talk.
But his question was why do marauders and robbers appear to succeed and benefit from life whilst the righteous and innocent appear to suffer for no reason. It did not make sense.

Reconciling a fair and just God and an unfair life is a difficult question that almost everyone asks at some point. Perhaps it is too simplistic but the Bible describes a perfect world early in the book of Genesis. The perfect world became imperfect at human intervention as we asserted our own sovereignty over God’s sovereignty. The result was death, beginning with the death of an innocent animal (Genesis 3:21), the result of that has a knock on effect down the generations and the earth still suffers (Romans 8:22) but God’s plan is a plan of restoration and redemption (Revelation 21:3-4).
————————————-
Job 12:11-25
11 Does not the ear test words
as the tongue tastes food?
12 Is not wisdom found among the aged?
Does not long life bring understanding?
13 “To God belong wisdom and power;
counsel and understanding are his.
14 What he tears down cannot be rebuilt;
those he imprisons cannot be released.
15 If he holds back the waters, there is drought;
if he lets them loose, they devastate the land.
16 To him belong strength and insight;
both deceived and deceiver are his.
17 He leads rulers away stripped
and makes fools of judges.
18 He takes off the shackles put on by kings
and ties a loincloth around their waist.
19 He leads priests away stripped
and overthrows officials long established.
20 He silences the lips of trusted advisers
and takes away the discernment of elders.
21 He pours contempt on nobles
and disarms the mighty.
22 He reveals the deep things of darkness
and brings utter darkness into the light.
23 He makes nations great, and destroys them;
he enlarges nations, and disperses them.
24 He deprives the leaders of the earth of their reason;
he makes them wander in a trackless waste.
25 They grope in darkness with no light;
he makes them stagger like drunkards.
——————————————————————
Old age was respected and revered in Job’s day. The old were wise and were to be listened to (see Job 32:6-7).

The initial verses are speaking of the senses of man being in tune with God as well.
The school of hard knocks is a good teaching ground and perhaps the only way most of us grow and learn. Older people are seasoned by life, they learn how to overcome challenges. Understanding comes from accumulated experience and learning.
Job, despite his questions about his suffering, affirms that God’s power is visible in nature, human society, religious matters, and national and international affairs. Job, however, expressed this in terms of fatalistic despair. Job knew all this and it didn’t help (13:1-2); so he didn’t want to argue with them anymore – he wanted to take his case before God (verse 3).

While his distress clouded this truth at times, Job knew deep down that God was the ultimate reality in his life.

God builds up and God tears down. This is evident the story of the nation of Israel. God made Israel great. He made Solomon the wealthiest man who had ever lived. He became unfaithful to God and God took the kingdom away from his family. Israel fell and was taken into captivity because of their unfaithfulness.

There is no human or spiritual power that can usurp God or be a successful voice against him. He is sovereign and ruler of all nature. God controls the weather … He withholds rain from heaven (Deuteronomy 11:17; 1 Kings 8:35; 17:1), the springs shrink, the rivers dry up, and a fruitful land is turned into a desert. And famine stalks through the land.
He caused the famous flood in Noah’s day. An extraordinary event in the history of the world, so much that traces are found in the traditions and stories of almost every race of man.

God is much more powerful than any ruler. God gives power to rulers (John 19:11). And God causes their power to end (Daniel 2:21). God appoints new kings (1 Kings 19:15-16). God humbles the proud (Luke 1:51-52).

The wise counsellors, or politicians, kings and kingdoms he can lead away as captives in triumph. Their wisdom can dissipate as a result of their own pride and God’s intervention, power and dignity can be removed in an instant.

Kings are king, because God ordained it. When a king becomes evil, God may send another king to put him into captivity. It is God who allows him to aspire to greatness, and God who binds him as a common criminal. Israel’s captivity in Babylon is a prime example. God led the king of Babylon to take the king of Israel. Later on, God had another king to overthrow the king of Babylon.

The Kings and judges of the earth must remember that they will someday stand before the Judge and King of all the world.

All of mankind is God’s creation. Both the deceiver and deceived are his. Everything in heaven and under heaven is in his hands. Job’s struggle was why doesn’t he intervene to ensure that justice and fairness reign true.

There are no things planned by men that God does not know. They may have planned it in some secret place, but God knows all of their plans. He used one such plot to be the pivotal point in human history!

Israel became almost three million people while they were slaves in Egypt. Just over seventy people went into Egypt and almost three million came out. This same three million were reduced to just a remnant by God for their unfaithfulness.

Human power, leadership and authority is ordained by God for his ultimate purpose and is removed for the same reason. He knows what he is doing. There is an eternal picture here. The problem with Job, the problem with his friends and the problem with us is that we see the here and now about as far as what’s immediately in front of us and we make a judgment against other humans and even about what God is doing on that basis alone without consideration for the eternal and allowing God to do all the judging.

Job 10

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Job 10:1-7

10 “I loathe my very life;
therefore I will give free rein to my complaint
and speak out in the bitterness of my soul.
2 I say to God: Do not declare me guilty,
but tell me what charges you have against me.
3 Does it please you to oppress me,
to spurn the work of your hands,
while you smile on the plans of the wicked?
4 Do you have eyes of flesh?
Do you see as a mortal sees?
5 Are your days like those of a mortal
or your years like those of a strong man,
6 that you must search out my faults
and probe after my sin—
7 though you know that I am not guilty
and that no one can rescue me from your hand?

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In this chapter, Job shifted his thinking from himself and started to focus on God and why God had done such a thing.

He begins this by saying that he really did not want to live in the pain and suffering. His worst pain was that of his heart feeling that he might have displeased God. He was sick in his soul with bitterness toward his hopeless life.

He could not explain God’s attitudes. God carefully designed Job’s body. But now God seemed to be punishing him without any reason. He was struggling to find meaning and purpose in his suffering.

He did not know what to say to God (Job 9:14). He was afraid of God’s great power (Job 9:17). But he was not afraid that God might kill him. is suffering was so great that he wanted to die.

Why was God opposing Job and why were those who had no regard for God doing okay? It just didn’t make sense.

Job wanted to know what God had condemned him for that he might repent. He loved God and wanted to be back in fellowship with him. 

In verses 4-7 it is very evident that he believed he was innocent. He now quite facetiously, and somewhat sarcastically, asked if God was as limited in His ability to discern Job’s spiritual condition as were Job’s friends. He concluded by affirming that God did know he was innocent and that there was no higher court of appeal (verse 7).

He tried to wrestle with another explanation. Perhaps God had a plan that people could not see. He knew that God could see beyond the physical and into a man’s heart and soul. The judgment of men is always on the outward.

He asserts that the conduct of man in strictly marking faults, and in being unwilling to forgive.  He wrestles with the idea of whether it is possible that God could be governed by such feelings as these.

He wrestled with the idea that God’s judgment was as harsh and flawed as man’s judgment. I think this is something we all wrestle with from time to time when things don’t go the way we want them to go or expect them to go.

“God is punishing me” we might say when actually every act of God is an act of love. Even a so called punishment is an act of discipline rather than an act of condemnation.

Yesterday, as I walked to the corner shop and back early in the morning after having my quiet time I thought about how free and at peace I feel. I thanked God for it and thought about how much pressure I have put upon myself since my early 20’s. 

Pressure of being a certain way or in a certain mold, trying to prove myself at work, in music, to family, in the church … trying to be somebody and through all that time I never really felt that I was anybody but today I do. I actually do feel fully alive and fully authentic. Far from perfect, far from even good. I am a dark minded, melancholic, fearful, self focused man with a huge ego and an obsession for sex that if I allow it to run loose can take me into very dark places.

I don’t feel guilty about that, I don’t feel any condemnation or shame. It’s just who I am and what I have to contend with in my life. Other people have to contend with different things but these are the things that I have to contend with. I’m okay with that. It’s not a case of “I used to be this and now I am better” … no, I will always be this but at the same time “I am clothed with Christ” because these things are no longer my identity. They have a place in my story and I don’t wish to live in those spaces anymore but they are still present and I am always just a decision away from allowing them to reign in me again. 

Today, however it is Christ that reigns. Peace and freedom are in this space that was once occupied by turmoil and condemnation. There is no condemnation in Christ (Romans 8:1)
———————————————

Job 10:8-12

8 “Your hands shaped me and made me.
Will you now turn and destroy me?
9 Remember that you moulded me like clay.
Will you now turn me to dust again?
10 Did you not pour me out like milk
and curdle me like cheese,
11 clothe me with skin and flesh
and knit me together with bones and sinews?
12 You gave me life and showed me kindness,
and in your providence watched over my spirit.

———————————————
Job knew that his being was a complex creation. He was fearfully and wonderfully made. He knew that his body was a miraculous wonder as was all life. He knew that God did not cause Job to live by accident. He knew that God had blessed his existence but could not fathom why God had given him life, cared for his well being only to destroy him in what seemed to be very cruel. He compared it to the idea of a cheese maker pouring out milk only to allow it to curdle and having to discard it as useless.

These facts made Job’s problem seem even stranger. Surely, God would not cruelly destroy the person that he made so carefully. Job was wrestling with this but could not find meaning in it.
———————————————

Job 10:13-17

13 “But this is what you concealed in your heart,
and I know that this was in your mind:
14 If I sinned, you would be watching me
and would not let my offense go unpunished.
15 If I am guilty—woe to me!
Even if I am innocent, I cannot lift my head,
for I am full of shame
and drowned in my affliction.
16 If I hold my head high, you stalk me like a lion
and again display your awesome power against me.
17 You bring new witnesses against me
and increase your anger toward me;
your forces come against me wave upon wave.

———————————————

Job continued to wrestle with the meaning of what had happened and was happening to him.

Perhaps God had a secret plan. Perhaps God was using him to prove that all people were evil. So God made Job. He was much better than other people; but everybody does wrong. So God punished Job in public to warn everyone about their evil deeds.

Is this a foreshadowing of the need for a messiah?

In verse 16 we read that God is compared to a lion who savagely pursues his prey. In the NT the devil is given the same comparison by Peter as he writes to the churches in Asia Minor (1 Peter 5:8)

It seemed to Job that everything was happening to him at once. His animals and servants were lost in a war of sorts. His own friends had spoken against him. The indignation of God seemed to be upon him, things just seemed to be escalating from bad to worse.

He was struggling to make sense of this and all the time God was silent!
———————————————

Job 10:18-22

18 “Why then did you bring me out of the womb?
I wish I had died before any eye saw me.
19 If only I had never come into being,
or had been carried straight from the womb to the grave!
20 Are not my few days almost over?
Turn away from me so I can have a moment’s joy
21 before I go to the place of no return,
to the land of gloom and utter darkness,
22 to the land of deepest night,
of utter darkness and disorder,
where even the light is like darkness.”
—————————————————-
Job returned to the question of why God allowed him to be born. This time he was not just lamenting the day of his birth, but he was asking God for the reason He allowed it to occur.

Job realised that he could not explain his troubles. His pain was intense. He wanted to die.

A short existence would have been the next thing to no existence at all, and would have equally satisfied his wishes.
Job’s big question to God was “Why was I ever born”?

I remember saying the same thing to,my mum as a teenager in a rage about something. I don’t remember the subject of the rage except that I am sure it was something about the fairness of life. I do remember mum being very offended at the question and tearing a strip off me for it.

Job knew that all life comes from God. Without God, Job would die. So Job prayed that God would leave him. Then, Job’s troubles would end at least for a brief moment. And so Job would die.

Job had some erroneous ideas about death. He thought only about the death of the body. He saw how dead bodies slowly disappear into the earth. Nobody can disturb a person who has died.

He may not have grasped the full eternal implications of what happens to our spirit at death but his talk of darkness and chaos was one of despair and his words to God were words of “why delay it? Just let me go on and get this over with.”