Job 26

storm clouds


Job 26:1-4

26 Then Job replied:
2 “How you have helped the powerless!
How you have saved the arm that is feeble!
3 What advice you have offered to one without wisdom!
And what great insight you have displayed!
4 Who has helped you utter these words?
And whose spirit spoke from your mouth?
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In verses 1-4 Job responded to Bildad’s lack of concern for him, showing that all his friends’ theological and rational words missed the point of Job’s need altogether and have been completely unhelpful.

Job himself has virtually said much the same as Bildad (Job 9:2; Job 14:4), so he makes no further comment on his remarks here, but merely asks how he has helped him with such words, or others like him in a weak and helpless condition.

In six sarcastic questions Job tells Bildad that God would be in a great deal of trouble if Bildad had not been there to help God! Then Job outdoes Bildad in describing the majesty, power and greatness of God.
Job had studied wisdom (chapter 28). So Job believed that words about God should not merely come from the human mind. Rather, such words should come from God’s Holy Spirit (2 Peter 1:21).

In chapter 25, Bildad’s speech seemed to describe vast spaces. He spoke about heaven. He spoke about the moon and stars. He spoke about the soil. And he referred to graves. Job’s reply seems to describe even more vast spaces. Job spoke about hell as well as heaven. He spoke about the sky and the clouds. He spoke about mysteries of the day, for example the horizon and the rain.

Job also spoke about some events which we will look at in verses 12-13. We do not know much about these events. We may not even be sure whether these are past or future events. But the Bible seems to mention the same events elsewhere. Some people think that Job was referring to stories from other ancient societies. Possibly, stories from Mesopotamia.
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Job 26:5-14

5 “The dead are in deep anguish,
those beneath the waters and all that live in them.
6 The realm of the dead is naked before God;
Destruction lies uncovered.
7 He spreads out the northern skies over empty space;
he suspends the earth over nothing.
8 He wraps up the waters in his clouds,
yet the clouds do not burst under their weight.
9 He covers the face of the full moon,
spreading his clouds over it.
10 He marks out the horizon on the face of the waters
for a boundary between light and darkness.
11 The pillars of the heavens quake,
aghast at his rebuke.
12 By his power he churned up the sea;
by his wisdom he cut Rahab to pieces.
13 By his breath the skies became fair;
his hand pierced the gliding serpent.
14 And these are but the outer fringe of his works;
how faint the whisper we hear of him!
Who then can understand the thunder of his power?”
———————————————-

Job used three words to describe the place of the dead: “the waters, hell,” and “destruction”: This is his way of saying that if God sees what is going on in the world of the dead, He certainly knows all the world of the living. God has authority over the realms of both the dead and the living.

In verses 5-14 as before in chapters 9 and 12, Job showed that he was not inferior to this friends in describing God’s greatness. He understood that as well as they did. He described it as manifested in the realm of the dead called Sheol and Abaddon, or place of destruction (verses 5 and 6), the earth and sky (verse 7), the waters above (verses 8-10) and below (verse 12, and the stars (verse 13).

The Hebrew word is the Rephaim, who were among the aboriginal inhabitants of the south of Palestine and the neighbourhood of the Dead Sea.
It is used to express the dead and the inhabitants of the underworld generally. The translation is awkward but it seems to imply that they are pierced through with terror, or they tremble.

All the secrets of this mysterious, invisible, and undiscoverable world are naked and open before God. The grave lies naked and destruction is uncovered.

Job described hell. Elsewhere, Job was not sure whether hell exists (Job 3:13-14; Job 21:22-26). But in these verses, Job was not explaining his own ideas. Instead, he was speaking by the power of the Holy Spirit.

Bildad had thought of God as dwelling in heaven alone. He did not realize that God was omnipresent. God is not only in heaven but on the earth as well. This could be speaking of hell that is under the water.

Even hell is within the view of God. It is also under the control of God. God is not controlled by anyone or anything. Even Satan has to answer to him and cannot leave his presence.

In verses 7-10 and 13: With great accuracy, Job described the world as it is – created out of “nothing” by the Maker of heaven and earth (Genesis 1:1). This is especially remarkable since the Book of Job predates the Book of Genesis. He speaks of the Holy Spirit’s role in Creation. (Genesis 1:2, 26). 

This is breath taking and inspiring. We all need moments to stop and take it in. Our modern world is too fast paced for us to sometimes stop and be inspired. We live behind too much concrete and in too much artificial light. We are too full of our human ingenuity (which God gave us) and can lose sight of God’s awesomeness.
Many ancient people thought that the earth was on poles. Even Job mentions these poles elsewhere. But Job’s words here are correct. Scientists have proved that an empty space surrounds the world. God balances the world on nothing.

It was by God’s hand that the stars were scattered into space. Of course, all planets, the moon and sun, were created by God, and placed in the empty space of the sky; and told to stay in their places. The earth is not hanging or sitting on anything. It is in the open sky, where God put it and told it to stay.

God’s design of this world is amazing. We need the rain. Nothing holds the rain in the sky. It doesn’t make sense that something as heavy as water can be held in the sky and poured out at an appropriate time. Of course we have scientific explanations for it but the design and system behind the science didn’t come from a human mind. 

As a mere observer in the days of Job when science was not so advanced it would have filled with wonder and if you stop and engage with nature and even think about it in some detail with it’s complex eco systems … it’s just mind blowing.

Verse 9 reminds us that We are dealing with the King of Kings, the only true king. We may not see him but it doesn’t stop him from being king!!!

The theme of God’s power over the sea (“water with bounds”) is common to the poetic genres in the Bible (Psalm 104:7-9; Proverbs 8:27-29; Jeremiah 5:22). For God to have power over the chaos of the sea symbolized that He has power over everything that seems chaotic and evil to humanity. Imagine the disciples reaction when Jesus calmed the storm or walked on water. They would have been familiar with these verses. I shiver runs down my spine as I imagine the situation. I imagine whispers of  “Who is this rabbi that is with us?”

This describes the earth as a circular sphere, a scientifically accurate statement before it’s time in human history.

In verse 11 we are reminded that no one can usurp God’s power. Satan’s best attempt will leave him destroyed at the end of all things. God created the world by his word (Genesis 1:3-26). Psalm 2:4-6 has feelings and emotions. When driven by human emotion we can be very powerful and influence a lot. Passion is a great galvanizer. How much more the passion of an unlimited God? Nobody can successfully oppose God.

Verses 11-13 seem to describe a particular event.
·     The enemy in verse 12 is called RAHAB in Hebrew. This word is also in Isaiah 51:9. Isaiah seems to be describing a terrible sea animal. This however is a symbolic description of the army from Egypt. Or, as a description of the sea. God’s people were tapped by the sea but God parted the sea to allow the Israelites to escape (Isaiah 51:10). The Egypt army drowned (Exodus chapter 14).

·     The enemy in verse 13 is NACHASH in Hebrew. This word usually means a snake or serpent. In the garden called Eden, the devil appeared as a NACHASH. This word is also in Isaiah 27:1. Isaiah described the same event as Job 26:13. But in Isaiah, the NACHASH has another name too. This name is leviathan. The word leviathan is in Job 3:8 and Job chapter 41. We have translated leviathan as ‘crocodile’, which seems to be the animal that God described in Job chapter 41. But in both Isaiah and Job, leviathan could potentially by symbolic of Satan.
So, in the end, God will punish the devil (Revelation 20:10). This is the event that Isaiah described in Isaiah 27:1. But the words in Isaiah 27:1 are similar to Isaiah 51:9. So we think that Job was describing the devil’s final punishment in verses 11-13.

In the closing verses of this chapter Job offers a perspective that all he had cited about God’s unrivalled power over the grave, over nature, over the earth and skies, was a faint outline of His infinite, incomprehensible sovereignty.

Poetic language reminding his counselors that all that could be said and understood by man was only a glimpse of the nature and power of God almighty!

We know that thunder is connected with the voice of God frequently. When Moses had the Israelites at the foot of the mountain to hear the Commandments, the voice of God was spoken of as a thunder. It gripped the Israelites with fear.

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